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Wednesday, November 10

Sunday, September 19

  1. page Moratorium Movement edited {morimove.jpg} MORATORIUM MOVEMENT The first Moratorium took place in America. It was organised…
    {morimove.jpg}
    MORATORIUM MOVEMENT The first Moratorium took place in America. It was organised by anti-war groups, and based upon the involvement in the Vietnam War, aiming to withdraw Australian and other foreign troops from Vietnam and secondly, to repeal the National Service Act 1964 (Cth). As the Moratoriums were the first nationwide response to the Vietnam War, a huge turning point in the anti-war movement was established. In relevance to Heart of Darkness, and Apolocolypse Now, all I can think of is the anti-war movement, and protest of involvement in the war. I'll work on this.. more to come I suppose.

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    5:28 am
  2. file morimove.jpg uploaded
    4:29 am
  3. page The Deer Hunter edited ... The comparison of "Apocalypse Now" comes into play in act 3 where Michael is set on …
    ...
    The comparison of "Apocalypse Now" comes into play in act 3 where Michael is set on a mission to go upriver to find Nick.
    Once he is reached, he is past the point of no return - literally.
    ...
    infront of him,
    - to be continued -
    him.
    Nick is

    Bibliography -
    http://www.filmsite.org/deer3.html - 12:18 AM 10/09/2010
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    3:37 am
  4. page Hearts of Darkness edited {francis.jpg} Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse ... went insane." The t…
    {francis.jpg} Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse
    ...
    went insane."
    The title is derived from the source material for Apocalypse Now, the Joseph Conrad novella Heart of Darkness. Using behind the scenes footage, and narrated by Eleanor Coppola, it chronicles how production problems including bad weather, actors' health and other issues delayed the film, increasing costs and nearly destroying the life and career of Francis Ford Coppola. In 1990, Eleanor Coppola turned her material over to two young filmmakers George Hickenlooper and Fax Bahr who then shot new interviews with the original cast and crew and intercut them with her existing material.
    Originally aired on television in the United States, Hearts of Darkness won several awards: The National Board of Review, USA award for "Best Documentary," 1991, an American Cinema Editors award for "Best Edited Documentary", 1992, two Academy of Television Arts and Sciences awards for "Outstanding Individual Achievement - Informational Programming - Directing" and "Outstanding Individual Achievement - Informational Programming - Picture Editing", 1992, and the International Documentary Association award, 1992.
    ...
    other side."
    From

    From
    the moment
    ...
    this space.
    · Katherine Coppola narrates and is the lost female voice of Heart of Darkness and (the M-rated version of) Apocalypse Now.
    · Irony re: American imperialism in this country
    ...
    · Coppola refers to the making of the film as “The Idiodyssey”. This quote links the documentary to both Heart of Darkness and Apocalypse Now through the mythological/quest viewpoint.
    · Coppola’s own personal financial contribution illustrates his overriding obsession with making this film. He almost lost it all – the family estate in Napa, his American Zoetrope studio, but most importantly his independence as an artist from the studio system he despised.
    ...
    per day.
    · Use of newsreel and interviews lends the film gravitas and also places the events firmly within a particular historical context. They are also used to great effect to show how the soldiers were effected emotionally by the events unfolding and this encourages a range of emotional responses within the responder
    · Use of music for dramatic effect – Coppola’s use of Wagner as Kilgore’s unit bombs the village and La Boehme set against the film of the cyclone bearing down upon the coast
    ...
    actual attack
    · Throughout the film we see many examples of Coppola’s vision/focus/hubris. For example, his calculated and hysterical response to the media attention given to Martin Sheen’s near death experience.
    ...
    film set
    · Martin Sheen’s heart attack mirrors Marlowe’s near-death experience
    · The documentary is edited using music, and clips for particular dramatic effect – it is interesting to think that, by seeing behind the scenes of the film to the workings of the set that the responder may feel some kind of disassociation with the original text but quite the opposite happens. This text is made to be just as dramatic as the film
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    12:30 am
  5. page Hearts of Darkness edited {francis.jpg} Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse ... we went insane." “The …
    {francis.jpg} Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse
    ...
    we went insane." “Theinsane."
    The title is derived from the source material for Apocalypse Now, the Joseph Conrad novella Heart of Darkness. Using behind the scenes footage, and narrated by Eleanor Coppola, it chronicles how production problems including bad weather, actors' health and other issues delayed the film, increasing costs and nearly destroying the life and career of Francis Ford Coppola. In 1990, Eleanor Coppola turned her material over to two young filmmakers George Hickenlooper and Fax Bahr who then shot new interviews with the original cast and crew and intercut them with her existing material.
    Originally aired on television in the United States, Hearts of Darkness won several awards: The National Board of Review, USA award for "Best Documentary," 1991, an American Cinema Editors award for "Best Edited Documentary", 1992, two Academy of Television Arts and Sciences awards for "Outstanding Individual Achievement - Informational Programming - Directing" and "Outstanding Individual Achievement - Informational Programming - Picture Editing", 1992, and the International Documentary Association award, 1992.
    Relevance to Apocalypse Now “The
    film Francis
    ...
    other side."
    From the moment Eleanor Coppola utters this quote it is clear that the comparisons being made between this text, Apocalypse Now and Heart of Darkness is not coincidental; she wastes no time in introducing the passion and quest for truth which defines the film and the responder is meant to see this as a parallel journey all the way through the film. Francis Ford Coppola, from her perspective, is the same obsessed, brilliant, tragic hero we see in Kurtz. The following notes are being posted in order to aid those of you who may be interested in using the documentary as a companion text to Heart of Darkness. They are by no means comprehensive, so watch this space.
    · Katherine Coppola narrates and is the lost female voice of Heart of Darkness and (the M-rated version of) Apocalypse Now.
    · Irony re: American imperialism in this country
    · Film shot in the Philippines and Coppola has to bribe dictator Ferdinand Marcos to film there
    · Note the references to Dispatches by Michael Herr – this text is known to have influenced Coppola in terms of representation of soldiers
    · Responder perception in 80’s compared to 1991 – Coppola is clearly illustrating the values of text in terms of historical/social/cultural perspectives
    · Coppola refers to the making of the film as “The Idiodyssey”. This quote links the documentary to both Heart of Darkness and Apocalypse Now through the mythological/quest viewpoint.
    · Coppola’s own personal financial contribution illustrates his overriding obsession with making this film. He almost lost it all – the family estate in Napa, his American Zoetrope studio, but most importantly his independence as an artist from the studio system he despised.
    · Katherine Coppola does not hold anything back, even admitting the exploitation of Vietnamese workers on the film set who were paid $1.00 per day.
    · Use of newsreel and interviews lends the film gravitas and also places the events firmly within a particular historical context. They are also used to great effect to show how the soldiers were effected emotionally by the events unfolding and this encourages a range of emotional responses within the responder
    · Use of music for dramatic effect – Coppola’s use of Wagner as Kilgore’s unit bombs the village and La Boehme set against the film of the cyclone bearing down upon the coast
    · Threat of actual attack
    · Throughout the film we see many examples of Coppola’s vision/focus/hubris. For example, his calculated and hysterical response to the media attention given to Martin Sheen’s near death experience.
    · Orson Welles reads from Heart of Darkness over scenes from the film set
    · Martin Sheen’s heart attack mirrors Marlowe’s near-death experience
    · The documentary is edited using music, and clips for particular dramatic effect – it is interesting to think that, by seeing behind the scenes of the film to the workings of the set that the responder may feel some kind of disassociation with the original text but quite the opposite happens. This text is made to be just as dramatic as the film
    

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    12:28 am
  6. page THe Anti-War Movement edited The Anti-War Movement: Pt. 1: 1965-1968 {webkit-fake-url://172E44AE-4BE7-4248-BFC9-9B991FB5B4DB/p…
    The Anti-War Movement: Pt. 1: 1965-1968
    {webkit-fake-url://172E44AE-4BE7-4248-BFC9-9B991FB5B4DB/pastedGraphic.pdf} pastedGraphic.pdf{webkit-fake-url://E2E1636F-5143-4509-9CF3-DF37FFC7344D/map1.jpg} map1.jpg
    The Vietnam
    ...
    States] history”.
    The first anti-war movement was in 1965; teach-ins in colleges that were educational protests, and by 1986 there were some 7 million protestors nationwide. The protestors consisted mainly of students and youths. The anti-war movement received attention by even the White House, when 25,000 people marched along Washington Avenue.
    However, despite the efforts of the teach-ins in several hundred colleges, numerous more would not partake in protesting. “Within the US government, some saw these teach-ins as an important development that might slow down on further escalation in Vietnam.”
    ...
    //http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/vietnam/antiwar.html//, 6/9/10.
    Part 2 coming soon, Bianka Lee.
    Relevance to Heart of Darkness: I have found a comparison using the opening passage of Heart of Darkness leaves interpretation in regards to the Anti-War movement.
    Imagery:

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    12:27 am

Thursday, September 16

  1. page The Hanged Man edited Modern versions of the tarot deck depict a man hanging upside-down by one foot. The figure is mo…

    Modern versions of the tarot deck depict a man hanging upside-down by one foot. The figure is most often suspended from a wooden beam (as in a cross or gallows) or a tree. Ambiguity results from the fact that the card itself may be viewed inverted.
    The gallows from which he is suspended forms a Tau cross, while the figure—from the position of the legs—forms a fylfot cross. There is a nimbus about the head of the seeming martyr. The tree of sacrifice is living wood, with leaves thereon; the face expresses deep entrancement, not suffering; the figure, as a whole, suggests life in suspension, but life and not death.
    Waite suggests the card carries the following meanings or keywords:

    Sacrifice ----- Letting go ----- Surrendering ----- Passivity

    Suspension ----- Acceptance ----- Renunciation ----- Patience

    New point of view ----- Contemplation ----- Inner harmony

    Conformism ----- Nonaction ----- Waiting ----- Giving up
    The Hanged Man's symbolism points to divinity, linking it to the Passion of Christ in Christianity, especially The Crucifixion; to the narratives of Osiris (Egyptian mythology) and Mithras (Ancient Persian mythology, Roman mythology). In all of these archetypal stories, the destruction of self brings life to humanity; on the card, these are symbolized respectively by the person of the hanged man and the living tree from which he hangs bound. Its relationship to the other cards usually involves the sacrifice that makes sacred; personal loss for a greater good or a greater gain.
    It is often associated with Odin, the primary god of the Norse Pantheon. Odin hung upside down from the world-tree, Yggdrasil, for nine days to attain wisdom and thereby retrieved The Runes from the Well of Wyrd, which the Norse cosmology regarded as the source and end of all Mystery and all knowledge. The moment he glimpsed the runes, he died, but the knowledge of them was so powerful that he immediately returned to life.
    - His face is always peaceful, never suffering.
    Basic Tarot Story
    The Fool settles beneath a tree, intent on finding his spiritual self. There he stays for nine days, without eating, barely moving. People pass by him, animals, clouds, the wind, the rain, the stars, sun and moon. On the ninth day, with no conscious thought of why, he climbs a branch and dangles upside down like a child, giving up for a moment, all that he is, wants, knows or cares about. Coins fall from his pockets and as he gazes down on them - seeing them not as money but only as round bits of metal - everything suddenly changes perspective. It is as if he's hanging between the mundane world and the spiritual world, able to see both. It is a dazzling moment, dreamlike yet crystal clear. Connections he never understood before are made, mysteries are revealed.
    But timeless as this moment of clarity seems, he realizes that it will not last. Very soon, he must right himself, and when he does, things will be different. He will have to act on what he's learned. For now, however, he just hangs, weightless as if underwater, observing, absorbing, seeing.
    Basic Tarot Meaning
    With Neptune (or Water) as its planet, the Hanged Man is perhaps the most fascinating card in the deck. It reflects the story of Odin who offered himself as a sacrifice in order to gain knowledge. Hanging from the world tree, wounded by a spear, given no bread or mead, he hung for nine days. On the last day, he saw on the ground runes that had fallen from the tree, understood their meaning, and, coming down, scooped them up for his own. All knowledge is to be found in these runes.
    The Hanged Man, in similar fashion, is a card about suspension, not life or death. This is a time of trial or meditation, selflessness, sacrifice, prophecy. The Querent stops resisting; instead he makes himself vulnerable, sacrifices his position or opposition, and in doing so, gains illumination. Answers that eluded him become clear, solutions to problems are found. He sees the world differently, has almost mystical insights. This card can also imply a time when everything just stands still, a time of rest and reflection before moving on. Things will continue on in a moment, but for now, they float, timeless.
    The Hanged Man appears to be a captive, suffering an undeserved punishment under the power of an unknown malicious force. This initial impression generally leaves a reader with the uneasy feeling that the card portends disaster or trouble. However, when viewed more closely, the positive aspects of the card become more evident. The young man bears a peaceful countenance upon his face, much more the look of a man content with his fate than at the mercy of unknown powers. He also has a bright yellow halo around his head, suggestive of his purity and innocence. The Hanged Man is a willing victim, someone who has chosen the path of sacrifice to accomplish a higher goal. He hangs upside down upon a cross, like St. Peter who was crucified upside down for his witness to the message of Jesus. The Hanged Man represents the willingness to forsake the temptations of instant gratification for a higher cause, and because of his willing sacrifice he accomplishes the goals he has in his heart. When we encounter the Hanged Man, we should consider areas in our lives where we may need to act in a more selfless manner either for the benefit of others or for the fulfilment of our own deeper needs. In contrast, we may need to examine our life for areas in which we are giving too much to others at the expense of our own mental and spiritual well-being. What emotions does the image of the Hanged Man stir in you?
    This card represents self-denial, changes in fortune, or perhaps your patience and endurance will be put to the test. It means that when you come face to face with the reality of the situation in which you are in, you find something else which will prove of greater value to you. It may be that you have to sacrifice your previous beliefs or even way of life, but it is a time of renewal and your life will go forward.
    Hanged Man - Reversed Tarot Card Meanings
    When the Hanged Man is reversed you are involved with a nebulous, evasive individual who could, at worst, have a drink or drugs problem, but is, at best, unable to give you what you need or want. While indisputably romantic and sensitive, your partner remains elusive about lasting commitment. This person is unlikely to be ready for a serious relationship, do not be misled, for you will only receive unhappiness if you persist. Sometimes The Hanged Man signifies a lover for whom you must wait patiently. When the time is right you will be ale to get to know this person more intimately.
    Preoccupied with yourself. Stop it. Resistance to spiritual teachings. Arrogance. Efforts on projects are wasted. Loss of something you want or need.
    The Hanged Man reversed suggests a loss of faith in your ability to surmount life's obstacles. You may be refusing to go within for spiritual nourishment. It is very important at this time to look within through meditation and restore your faith in your ability to get over life's challenges. Know that this difficult time will soon pass - accept your circumstances and be at peace with yourself
    Man asks us to make is in the form of giving up things in our lives that do not serve us. By suspending ourselves (thoughts, actions, emotions) we can gain perspective in order to identify the habits we cling to that hinder our progress. Sometimes in a reading the Hanged Man can be a message that we should set aside our own needs for the needs of others around us too.
    Key Symbols Relative to Hanged Man Tarot Card Meanings:
    This section focuses in on a few select symbols that can help us further define the Hanged Man Tarot card meanings.
    Legs:
    The Hanged man is dangling by his left leg - our left appendages are symbols of higher awareness. We also see the man's legs cross in an odd formation one leg straight and the other crossed at a right angle. This is a symbol of a cross-roads - that our thoughts have bubbled up to a jumble that has got us stuck - we are at a cross-roads and at a loss for decision. This ties in with the Hanged Man's advice to take no action. Rather, calm yourself, be still, and yield to the situation - answers will come when we take the time to be still.
    .
    Head:
    As mentioned earlier, there is no expression of struggle or discomfort on the Hanged Man's face. This is a process of voluntary surrender, and he knows the outcome will lead to benefit. Further, we see a halo at his crown - this is a symbol of enlightenment, and gaining higher awareness and insight.
    .
    Ropes:
    Ropes have long been a symbol of binding or imprisonment. We've all gotten knots in our shoelaces, and we all know what happens when we frustratedly tug and shake at those knots in an effort to loosen their hold. Never works. However, when we take a deep breath, and take the time to slowly pick away and loosen the knot we are finally able to get that knot free. This is the message - the more we struggle and rage against our circumstances, the tighter our knots will be.
    Key Questions Relative to the Hanged Man Tarot Card Meanings:
    When contemplating the Hanged Man Tarot card meanings, ask yourself the following questions:

    Are you investing time to relax?

    Are you willing to sacrifice your expectations?

    Are you struggling with a decision or problem? Can you let it go?

    Are you over-extending yourself and need to take a "time-out" break?

    Should you wait a bit to make that decision you've been worried about?

    What activities in your life can you give up in order to allow more benefits?

    What beliefs and thoughts do have that hinder your progress? Can you give them up?

    Are there things/people in your life you are trying to control? Can you let go of that need to control?

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    8:15 pm

Sunday, September 12

  1. page Tet Offensive edited ... 31st January 1968 {images.jpeg} {Tet_Offensive.jpg} ... and Events: The 1968 Tet Off…
    ...
    31st January 1968
    {images.jpeg} {Tet_Offensive.jpg}
    ...
    and Events:
    The 1968 Tet Offensive was arguably the most important and significant series of attacks and battles during the Vietnam War. Launched in early 1968 by the Viet Cong, it marked a significant escalation in the scale and intensity of the War. Prior to the Offensive factions within the Viet Cong and N. Vietnamese government, under Vo Nguyen Giap’s influence saw the need for a swift, dramatic and unexpected movement, believing “A quick victory”, might be possible.
    General Giap was one of the finest military minds of the 20th century. He repeatedly showed his skills as a military leader in a number of battles during the first Indochina war against French Imperialism, such as during the battle of Dien Bien Phu. In the second Indochina war Giap strongly advocated guerrilla warfare and other military tactics that would be unexpected, unanticipated and foreign to their American and South Vietnamese enemies.
    ...
    Outcome and Impact:
    The Tet Offensive shocked America and their allies, especially as it occurred during a time they believed themselves to be winning the war. It was this event that was the catalyst for Americans to begin questioning their troops place in Vietnam. Graphic footage of the fighting in Saigon and Hue was broadcasted directly to households around the world. Even those who had previously supported the war, were deeply affected by these images. The bitterness, desperation and pain conveyed disturbed many.
    ...
    a reality.
    Relevance
    Relevance to Apocalypse Now:
    The
    The Tet Offensive
    ...
    have influenced Kopola.Coppola. The Tet
    ...
    on which KopolaCoppola built and
    Bibliography:
    War Without End (second edition), James Harpur, Longman Australia Pty limited, first published - 1990, second edition published - 1995, Melbourne Australia.
    ...
    2010. http://vietnam-war.commemoration.gov.au/tet-offensive/
    Tash.
    Tash.
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    6:37 pm
  2. page The Deer Hunter edited {deer-hunter.jpg} The Deer Hunter Michael Robert De Niro Nick Christopher Walken Steven …
    {deer-hunter.jpg}
    The Deer Hunter
    Michael
    Robert De Niro
    Nick
    Christopher Walken
    Steven
    John Savage
    Linda
    Meryl Streep
    Directed by Michael Cimino, the 1978 film "The Deer Hunter", was considered one of the most horrific and mentally distrubing vietnam films of its time.
    Though most of the action doesnt happen in the war itself, the blunt and forwardness of the aftershock and the brutal and tense feeling of the broken men, broken soldiers, can bring the audience shivers down their spine.
    As part of the audience, the irony is evident, but in this case, this is no satirical irony, it is the sad truth that makes the audience realise the right from wrong, the patriotic.. from the plain stupid.
    It is hard to achieve the full potential of this film, or what Cimino was aiming for (not because he didnt achieve it) but only because the time comparison from the present time to which it was released, just a couple years after saigon had fallen.
    Yet it still has that raw, eerie and dense feeling. As though it ought to be a horror rather then a war film.
    The film was, and still is, considered amongst the best and even recieved Nine Academy Award nominations, one of which went to Vilmos Zsigmond for best cinematography. Even now, its film techniques adds a roughness, almost documentry like to the story, achieving the realistic appeal that the audience needs to be emotionally and mentally exhausted, the idea is to give them the experience of the war, not to show them every little detail like your a-typical wartime movie, but to leave the events, all except one, to the audiences imagination and to even further, show them how it creates these broken men, these broken soldiers.
    Spanning the period of 1968-1975 the film is split into 3 acts -
    {the_deer_hunter.jpg}
    Act 1-
    Michael, Nick and Steven are three young factory workers from a small steel mill town, Clairton, Pensylvania, who have enlisted to fight in Vietnam. Characters are set, a nervous young bride is checking her wedding dress in the mirror, a loud russian mother is having a final confession with an orthadox priest: "I still do not believe this. My own boy with a strange girl and not so thin, if you understand my meaning...The next thing you know, he goes to Vietnam...I do not understand, Father. I understand nothing anymore, nothing...Can you explain? Can anyone explain?" Before leaving Steven marries the pregnant Angela whose wedding party is also the 3 mens farewell- in the background, above the bride and groom, a banner reads
    "SERVING GOD AND OUR COUNTRY PROUDLY".
    The newly weds skull wine, a russian tradition/suspicion, if the wine is spilt it means bad luck for the rest of the marriage, the camera zooms as red drops sink in to the brides pure white dress. This could also symbolise loss of innocence, purity; which as the mother of the groom can tell, is already underway.
    A soldier turns up, a green beret, whilst the drunk friends try to hold a conversation, obviously excited/nervous for the coming adventure, all the green beret can say is "fuck it" and slug down shot after shot.
    At the end of the night, raging with jealousy (after Nick confides in michael his proposal of marrying linda when they return) michael runs down the street stripping bare, until he reaches the basketball court, where nick catches up with him and makes michael promise him that he wont ever leave him behind in vietnam.
    A symbol of strong companionship.
    The next day, the young men accompanied by a few others, prepare for their last deer hunting trip together, Michael is seen as the leader, and has a strong belief in his one shot philosophy -
    Michael: I'll tell ya one thing, if I found out my life had to end up in the mountains, it'd be all right, but it has to be in your mind.
    Nick: What? One shot?
    Michael: Two is pussy.
    Nick: I don't think about one shot that much any more, Mike.
    Michael: You have to think about one shot. One shot is what it's all about. The deer has to be taken with one shot. I try to tell people that - they don't listen. Do you ever think about Vietnam?
    Nick: Yeah. I don't know. I guess I'm thinkin' about the deer, goin' to 'Nam. I like the trees, you know? I like the way the trees are on the mountains, all different. The way the trees are. I sound like some a--hole, right?
    Michael: I'll tell ya, Nick. You're the only guy I go huntin' with, you know. I like a guy with quick moves and speed. I ain't gonna hunt with no a--holes.
    A deer is killed- with one shot- and they all return to their favourite bar to celebrate, their friend axel takes to the piano* and the mood suddenly changes, the audience feels wary, and it is subtly shown that the men have only just realised, it is their turn to go to war.
    The sound of helicopters blades rhythmically whipping the air leads the film into its second act.
    *Chopin's Nocturne No. 6 in G Minor, Op. 15, No. 3
    {dhunter.jpg}
    Act 2-
    Two years later and the first scene opens with a rush of insanity, fire, helicopters, grenades, napalm, pigs eating singed corpses. Pure insanity.
    Michael, Nick and Steven are captured and become Prisoners Of War (POW's) in a riverside vietcong torture camp. They are forced to play Russian Roulette as part of the guards entertainment. Steven is punnished by incarceration to an underwater cage after aiming the gun to the roof and the bullet only just grazing his head.
    Mike and Nick are forced to play each other- Michael has the plan to load three bullets, as each of the 3 empty chambers have gone, Michael shoots their captors, leaving Nick to grab a machine gun to finnish them off. After having to pull a ravenous Nick off an enemy corpse, they escape as slightly more broken men, with their friend, the equally broken, Steven.
    As they traveled down river, an american helicopter manages to pick them up, Steven falls and Michael jumps after him, only Nick gets away safely.
    Steven has broken both his legs in the fall and it is up to Michael to get him back to friendly lines safely.
    Back in saigon, Nick is recouperating in a military hospital. Unable to remember his parents birthdays, he is slowly becoming more and more detatched from his previous life. He calls home.. but there's no answer.
    He travels from bar to bar, until he meets a frenchman, Julien Grinda, who leads him to a familiar past time, A Russian Roulette bar,
    Theres no going home now.. wherever that may be.
    {Deerhunter2.jpg}
    Act 3-
    Michael has come home! Though he appears to be the least affected out of the 3, he has the guilt of breaking his promise to Nick, as well as using that to his advantage.. getting closer to linda. Michael finds out that Steven is alive and manages to get the number of his hospital off his wife, the mentally disturbed Angela.
    As Michael enters the house, Angelas son is seen playing with a toy gun, points it at Michael and says in baby form - bang.
    Steven is at a veteran clinic with no legs and one arm, he tells michael of the large sum of money he's been recieving from saigon - Nick's still alive!
    Michael honouring his promise, makes the trip to saigon and with the help from the previous champagne drinking frenchman, finds Nick at the same Russian Roulette den, though it is steadily seen that he is too broken, too detatched to even recognise Michael. It is Nicks turn to play and Michael pays a large sum to get in the same game. Again, same situation as before (but with one bullet), barrel by barrel the empty shots are fired, Michaels last plea to nick is to remind him of their deer hunting days and of his well talked of philosophy:
    Michael: Do you remember the trees? Do you remember all the different ways of the trees? Do you remember that? Do you remember? Huh? The mountains? Do you remember all that?
    Nick: One shot. (He smiles and laughs in recognition.)
    Michael: One shot, one shot.
    bang - Nick raised the gun to his head, and like the deer, with one shot he was dead.
    Michael sat holding his dear friends head to his chest, overcome with pain, guilt and pure sadness.
    Back home again, and though the film started with a wedding, it's ending with a funeral. Friends and family are gathered, all in black. The coffin is carried too the herse, and Michael gazes through the small back window at the coffin, as though staring at a tv.
    The small group of friends go to their favourite bar for the wake, and the barman (also their friend) whilst making scrambled eggs, starts to sing "God Bless America" to cover the sound of his sobbing and tears. The rest of the party joins, and in an eerie murmur, sing the entirety of the song.
    “God bless America, Land that I love, Stand beside her and guide her, Thru the night with a light from above.”
    The movie ends with the friends making a toast to their friend Nick.
    Cant you just taste that irony?
    The comparison of "Apocalypse Now" comes into play in act 3 where Michael is set on a mission to go upriver to find Nick.
    Once he is reached, he is past the point of no return - literally.
    He cannot remember his past, nor does he see any future beyond what is infront of him,
    - to be continued -
    Bibliography -
    http://www.filmsite.org/deer3.html - 12:18 AM 10/09/2010
    I found this a very detailed and useful source, though the reliability still falls on the fact that its still only a review.
    http://www.hobomagazine.com/?q=node/93/print 12:30 AM 10/09/2010
    This is also a review but the language and great plot description was a great help.
    Please have a look! you will find this source very helpful indeed! also one of the only sources i have found that had the mention of Apocalypse now!

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    8:04 am

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